Sweden

Sweden

Postby Gabi_Munich » December 4th, 2010, 11:56 pm

I like this site of a Swedish collector very much

http://www.protopage.com/saintpauliahuset
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » November 6th, 2011, 9:47 pm

Agnetha also made an Eglish version of her website, but it took me some time to find it. Here is the link:

http://www.protopage.com/africanviolets

Definately one of the more original violet websites, I love the personal involvement/enthousiasm which shows everywhere!
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Re: Sweden

Postby Laci » November 6th, 2011, 9:56 pm

A few weeks ago I contacted with her and she promised to write about her hybridizing efforts and introduce herself to us :)
We can place the article on the website.
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » November 6th, 2011, 10:13 pm

Isabell Olevall (known to some of you I am sure) also has a small website about violets:

http://www.isabell.se/saintpaulia/
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Re: Sweden

Postby botan » February 21st, 2013, 12:07 am

Someone's lovely site:
http://blomtok.se/egna_hybrider.html
And as I could understand the following blog: http://blomblogg.blomtok.se/#category6.1
It has a great experience with hybridizing :)

PS: Awww Isabell have S. goetzeana! Is it still alive? conf:
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » February 21st, 2013, 11:33 pm

I don't think so: the photo is from 2001 and it was not on a list of what she had some years later. It is also not in her current "inventory". We can ask her if she knows of anyone who has it ...
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Re: Sweden

Postby botan » February 22nd, 2013, 8:40 am

Oh this will be really nice of you! Could you do this for me? This species is one of my favorite, but I can't find it anywhere. :?
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » February 22nd, 2013, 1:09 pm

I am curious myself, so no problem. Done.

There is a reason that you can't find this species: experiences are generally negative as it requires lower temperatures and higher moisture at least during the night. Only very few people are successfully maintaining this plant in the long term. But I am sure that you know this already.
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Re: Sweden

Postby botan » February 22nd, 2013, 1:34 pm

I didn't, but that I think, won't be a problem for me. ;)
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » February 22nd, 2013, 3:23 pm

A very quick answer from Isabell (who also gave permission to copy this to the forum):

I don't know if anybody in Europe has S. goetzeana outside a botanical garden (they may have it in Edinburgh, or at Kew - and I hope they have it in Herrenhausen, and possibly Helsinki). My specimens came from a friend in the US, but my plants died many years ago. Uppsala botanical garden does not have this species, and as far as I know Dibleys do not have it in their National Collection of Saintpaulia species.
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Re: Sweden

Postby avisrapax » February 23rd, 2013, 1:19 am

In their database Edinburgh has one in the Gesneriaceae research collections. I will be working indoors there in a few weeks and can always ask if it's still alive - they are very good about updating the databases, though, so I'd imagine it is.
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » February 23rd, 2013, 8:06 am

Wow!

Then I have a question for you/them as well: could you perhaps ask about Streptocarpus beampingaratrensis and S. variabilis? I would love to try growing these in a terrarium in Ljubljana ZOO, where we will exhibit a chameleon from Madagascar. It would be great to be able to show some Madagascar gesneriads (other suggestions welcome, but I fear S. thompsonii is not "showy" enough) besides some common houseplants from Madagascar. In this way we could show something of the amazing plant diversity from this island to our zoo visitors. Edinburgh has apparently a name that they are not too keen on sharing plant material with hobbyists, but this would fall under "a public institution working on education" and I understand that this might be easier under a CBD agreement. It would be so great if they could advise on growing conditions and provide starting material - after winter (now I have over 1 m snow).

Of course I am also just personally very interested in these plants, I will not hide that!

P.
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Re: Sweden

Postby avisrapax » February 23rd, 2013, 8:53 pm

Yes, it looks like they have them: here is the page from the db. for some reason when you search for streps it adds some other genera first...

I think it's fair they have a reputation for that - they are not allowed to pass on material and so they do not, even though it's frustrating and we can all see how it would be of benefit for some plants to be well spread around to reduce the chance of extinction =( It would be cool if they could help you out, though!
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Re: Sweden

Postby botan » February 23rd, 2013, 9:18 pm

Why I'm not so lucky like you, Paul?! :lol:
Today a friend of mine posted pic of variabilis asking if it is really streps, which means that I can get you one, or at least some seeds for sure. I was so surprised, I didn't expect that we have it in Bulgaria. :shock:

avisrapax wrote:they are not allowed to pass on material and so they do not

Oh, that is awful... they have S. goetzeana. I feel like a child with the cookie jar on the fridge.
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Re: Sweden

Postby illustrator » February 24th, 2013, 7:06 pm

Actually, I find it much easier to grow plants at home, where I can look as many times as I want. In the ZOO I jump frfom building to building and of course there are weekends, holidays and so on. Even though we have a very good team, when more people are in charge the chance increases that plants get too much or not enough water.

Seeds of S. variabilis are also in the seed funds, both in Sweden and in the USA. Only I feel unsure if I can grow it from seeds :-) Streptocarpus beampingaratrensis is a really special plant, even though it has quite small flowers. It is a Streptocarpus with many characteristics of a violet! I think that only Edinburgh has it.

>> I think it's fair they have a reputation for that - they are not allowed to pass on material and so they do not, even though it's frustrating and we can all see how it would be of benefit for some plants to be well spread around to reduce the chance of extinction =( It would be cool if they could help you out, though!

We have similar policies in the ZOO-world, and also here it is sometimes very easy to see why and sometimes it seems that there is no logic at all untill you hear the history behind it. For a while it was really strict, now it is more in the direction that dangerous animals are not sold on and of course species for which it is very important that there is a controlled breeding in a studbook. This can also be with some lineages of animals which are otherwise not so rare. All very well, but then you dig into it and find that hobbyists have more and better specimens of some of these highly endangered species anyway ... I doupt that anyone has a complete overview, but I notice that despite sometimes strict policies there is also increasing cooperation between ZOO's and dedicated hobbyists. When I "translate" this experience with animals to the plant hobby I believe that it is especially important to take this hobby very serious, especially with regards to not mixing up labels and to try to keep growing some plants in the long term.

Personally I like to have "new" plants and I like to experiment, but I try to keep the wild violets (and some vintage) which I have going in the long term. Some violet cultivars and other plants I try and them exchange for something new.

>> Why I'm not so lucky like you, Paul?!

That's rather difficult to answer don't you think? :mrgreen: Today I felt somewhat less lucky, with 40 cm of fresh snow to clean in front of every animal enclosure/building (in the zoo there is 1 meter, at home now at least 1,5 m).
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Re: Sweden

Postby Gabi_Munich » February 15th, 2015, 2:37 pm

Here is another nice Swedish Website

http://ywwee.blogspot.de/
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Re: Sweden

Postby Birgitt » April 21st, 2015, 8:17 pm

Lotta Malmefeldt Website is very nice. happy02:

http://www.charlottesgimmick.se/32847475
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Re: Sweden

Postby Gabi_Munich » March 13th, 2017, 3:38 pm

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